What's On In Liverpool

at

Liverpool Radical Film Network will be screening the Oscar winning director Louie Psilhoyos’ film, Racing Extinction, followed by a discussion with Dr Clare Parkinson and Dr Richard Twine, Co-Directors of the Centre for Human Animal Studies at Edge Hill University. In the era of Trumpism, where data on climate change is increasingly subject to censorship, the film follows a team of artists and activists intent on showing the world never-before-seen images that expose issues of endangered species and mass extinction. The discussion that follows will look at issues around the sixth mass extinction crisis, the anthropocene, and the role of film in combatting the censorship of climate data.

Dr Claire Parkinson is Professor of Film, Television and Digital Media and Co-Director of the Centre for Human Animal Studies (CfHAS). Her research interests focus on media, film and Animal Studies; sustainable consumption; eco-media; American cinema; activism; and, film and politics.

Dr Richard Twine is a Senior Lecturer in Social Sciences and Co-Director of the Centre for Human Animal Studies at Edge Hill University. His research interests include gender studies, human/animal relations and environmental Sociology.

Anthony Killick is a PhD researcher at Edge Hill University, a filmmaker, and member of the Radical Film Network.

Ticket required.

View on fact.co.uk

at

The event brings together transgender individuals and organisations, voluntary/community sector groups, academics, researchers, health/legal services and representatives from Merseyside Police to exchange information and perspectives.

Current issues and future mechanisms for addressing and reducing transphobic discrimination will be explored.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

at

With Harry Cocks, University of Nottingham

At the time, the 1967 Sexual Offences Act was seen by many gay people as a very limited step. In fact, homosexuality entered a legal grey area of “unlawfulness” that defined it as a civil wrong. This resulted from the fact that lonely hearts ads that sought to connect men were defined as “unlawful” in the prosecution of the underground paper International Times (IT) in 1972. As a result, it was widely recognised that the 1967 Act was a very unsatisfactory compromise.

The annual public lecture series 2017 considers how attitudes and cultures change over time. Taking inspiration from the perceived social changes of 1967, our lecturers investigate some of the developments that have impacted on lives in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

At the time, the 1967 Sexual Offences Act was seen by many gay people as a very limited step. In fact, homosexuality entered a legal grey area of “unlawfulness” that defined it as a civil wrong. This resulted from the fact that lonely hearts ads that sought to connect men were defined as “unlawful” in the prosecution of the underground paper International Times (IT) in 1972. As a result, it was widely recognised that the 1967 Act was a very unsatisfactory compromise.

The annual public lecture series 2017 considers how attitudes and cultures change over time. Taking inspiration from the perceived social changes of 1967, our lecturers investigate some of the developments that have impacted on lives in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Connecting and monitoring patients has tangible benefits to society, but at what cost? Prof. Matt Wilson explores both the opportunities and pitfalls of what connected healthcare could bring and change how we treat our sick and elderly in the future.

Prof. Matt Wilson from Telecoms Cloud , a former Non-Executive Director in an NHS Trust, with a responsibility in Telehealth, will to take the audience through some lessons learned, some of the products in the market, what is currently being achieved by both the public and private sector while sharing his insights for how people are both treated for illnesses and monitored during recovery with a connected future.

Discover how the Internet is transforming healthcare, learn how it affects the patient experience and be inspired by what the future holds with connected Healthcare.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Tamasin Cave will talk about the UK’s £2bn lobbying industry and the tactics they use to bend government to their will: how lobbyists build relationships with government; their manipulation of the media; the way that they use academics, scientists, think-tanks, front groups and others to spread their messages; and their attacks on opposition groups. She will talk about how the private healthcare industry has lobbied to open up the NHS to more private operators – and how schools are going the same way; how energy companies have hired a small army of lobbyists to persuade government and local communities to support fracking; how the ‘revolving door’ works to support the arms industry; and more.

Tamasin is a writer, campaigner and commentator. Her new book, A Quiet Word: Lobbying, Crony Capitalism and Broken Politics in Britain, co-authored by Andy Rowell, shines a light into one of the darkest and least-understood corners of our political culture: the UK’s £2 billion commercial lobbying industry. She is a director of Spinwatch, which investigates corporate PR and lobbying, as well as government spin. Since 2007, she has also led the campaign for transparency regulations for lobbyists.

Registration required.

View on merseysideskeptics.org.uk

at

The objective of this symposium is to bring together a small number of key researchers whose research, whilst it may be based in separate disciplinary areas, and address different audiences, including those of medical sociology, gender studies and age studies (including childhood, youth studies and social gerontology), all use heath, well-being, illness and dis-ease, as vehicles through which to examine and illuminate the complexities and inequalities of the gender order.

Previous research in this area has noted that whilst the old binary of ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ has been replaced by a new plurality involving both old gender performances and norms and newer hybrid forms, these have not replaced inequality but added to its complexity. This is reflected in the new array of diagnoses, disease and psycho-pathologies that particularly appear in women. This symposium aims to explore this complexity via new empirical and theoretical contributions as well as a focus on the different conditions exhibited by women at different stages and ages in the life course.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

at

Exploring themes of cultural heritage, the changing landscape of the world for young people, cultural milestones and images past and present, young people from Liverpool 8 have looked to the past in order to inform our future.

From the words of Dr Martin Luther King to the words of Donald Trump, from the experience of Ruby Bridges, the first black girl to attend a white school, to the growing increase of hate crime against young Muslims in school following the recent Manchester bombing, young, emerging and local artists are asked to use these themes as inspiration to create something in response, including performance poetry, theatre, DJing, live music, spoken word and song.

This is a protest.

This is the voice of young people.

Change must happen.

Ticket required.

View on everymanplayhouse.com

at

The post-war consensus is breaking up. The 2014 Scottish referendum, the election of Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader and the turmoil of the EU referendum all testify to an insurgent mood amongst swathes of the population.

In "How The Establishment Lost Control" Chris Nineham - founder member of the Stop The War colaition and author of "The People Versus Tony Blair" - attempts to explain these dramatic developments and to show how they question received notions about politics, history and how change happens. Above all they challenge widespread assumptions about the resilience of elite hegemony, the influence of conventional structures of thought and the ability of the mass of the population to think autonomously in a `post-ideological age'.

Booking required.

View on waterstones.com

More events next week...