Update for Monday 4th February 2019

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Communities and schools in at-risk areas are often vulnerable to far-right narratives. We offer frontline workers in-depth training to spot signs of radicalisation and raise awareness of the far right’s recruitment strategies and online influence.

Registration required

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Professor Rachel Williams will discuss how innovations in the design and production of advanced materials are making a significant contribution to the development of treatments for ophthalmic diseases.

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UK regions are currently wrestling with two grand challenges: a) the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the emergence of a data driven economy and b) globalisation, deindustrialisation and growing social and spatial inequalities. Spurred by the 2017 UK Government White Paper Industrial Strategy: Building a Britain fit for the future the former will energise a Fourth Industrial Revolution; the latter has already aggravated the UKs North-South divide, led to a vote to Brexit the EU and generated a demand that future growth be inclusive.

It is a particular concern for cities, city regions and even rural areas in the Northern Powerhouse that these two specific forces have the potential to unfold in deep contradiction and tension here. Firstly, the 2017 White Paper observes that AI ecosystems are already more developed in some UK regions; London, Edinburgh, Bristol, Cambridge and Edinburgh. Will these regions benefit from this head start so as to further entrench uneven geographical development and open up a new productivity gap between them and the Northern Powerhouse? Secondly, whilst the impact of AI on the labour market is the subject of much debate, it is likely that it will polarise income inequalities, creating more very high and very low paying jobs at the expense of a squeezed middle. Once machines replace human beings: No Humans Need Apply!

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Communities and schools in at-risk areas are often vulnerable to far-right narratives. Frontline workers will be offered in-depth training to spot signs of radicalisation and raise awareness of the far right’s recruitment strategies and online influence.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Ethnographic Collecting and African Agency in Early Colonial West Africa:
A Study of Trans- Imperial Cultural Flows
Dr Zachary Kingdon (World Museum Liverpool) will discuss the history of a remarkable collection of West African artworks housed at the World Museum Liverpool.

Zachary Kingdon’s new book illuminates the history of a remarkable collection of West African artworks housed at the World Museum Liverpool and other institutions in northwest England, which reflects Liverpool’s early colonial shipping and commercial links with western Africa.

His study provides a new assessment of the role played by African coastal elites in the creation of museum ‘ethnography’ collections in Britain and offers a new understanding of African collections in British museums.

In his talk, Kingdon will outline the early colonial context in which African artworks were gathered and explore particular African strategies of resistance and collaboration implicated in the creation of World Museum African collection.

Registration required

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On February 7th the staff in the Department of Politics at the University of Liverpool will be hosting a special social event for students to mark 30 years since the momentous events across Europe in 1989! Music will be provided by our very own resident DJ, Stuart Wilks Heeg who will be turning the tables back to the best music of '89! Also Birte Gippert will be speaking about how 1989 shaped Europe and the world we now live in.

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This national Celebrating Age Seminar will invite arts professionals to explore the importance of and the practicalities involved in building arts and culture experiences for older family members, learn from other culture professionals working with older audiences, and hear from leaders in this field.

With registration from 11am, the event will run from 11.30am – 4pm.

The programme will include:

Practical workshop and facilitated sharing session: to explore best practice and successful interventions for older and intergenerational audiences.
Case study: with City of London Sinfonia and Orchestras Live. Matthew Swann (CEO of CLS) and Sarah Derbyshire MBE (CEO of Orchestras Live) will present an in-depth case study of their recent dementia-friendly music project.
Digital panel: with FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology), Moving Memory Dance and Digital Ambassadors, focusing on older audiences and digital engagement.
Q&A: with Digital Ambassadors from FACT

Registration required

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Science & Society Lecture Series 2019 - Global challenges of Antimicrobial resistance - will drug-resistant infections spell the end of modern medicine?

Antimicrobial resistance – where bugs do not respond to the drugs we use to treat them - is a natural phenomenon that is accelerated through human actions. This escalating, global issue places millions of lives in jeopardy through limiting our ability to treat infections as well as putting global food security and agricultural livelihoods at risk. Mitigating this threat demands sustained action both nationally and internationally by all sectors.
In her talk, Dame Sally will discuss the complexity of AMR, the current and future impact is has, and the interventions that have already been taken and need to be taken to alleviate this threat.

Dame Sally was appointed Chief Medical Officer (CMO) for England and Chief Medical Advisor to the UK Government in March 2011. Dame Sally is an independent advisor to the UK Government on medical matters, with particular responsibilities regarding Public Health.

Dame Sally advocates globally on AMR. She has spoken on AMR at numerous events including, the World Health Assembly side events, the G8 Science Ministers’ meeting in 2015, the Global Health Security Initiative in 2015, and the UN General Assembly side event in 2016. She was chair of the 2013 AMR forum at the World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) and is chair of the WHO Strategic and Technical Advisory Group on AMR. Most recently, Dame Sally has been appointed a co-convener of the UN Inter-Agency Co-ordination Group on AMR, set up in response to the AMR declaration made at UNGA 2016.

Registration required.

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Ignite showcases Liverpool's movers and shakers, creators, thinkers, tinkers, innovators and doers, makers and dreamers in a fast paced format designed to inspire.

Ticket/registration required.

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International Slavery Museum and Mandela will give this unique opportunity to hear Dr Makaziwe (Maki) Mandela discuss the topic ‘Unity- what that meant to Nelson Mandela’.

Dr Maki Mandela, the eldest daughter of Evelyn Mase and Nelson Mandela, has had a full and varied career. She has presented numerous papers over the years, including on the role of women in a changing South Africa. She has been intricately involved in developing a substantial portfolio within Nozala, a women’s investment group, and using these funds in the economic empowerment of women in South Africa. Dr Mandela is currently the Chair of House of Mandela, a business that she started with her daughter Tukwini Mandela in 2010.

Dr Mandela is visiting Liverpool at the invitation of Mandela 8 and Liverpool City Council to commemorate the 29 year anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s release from prison on 11 February 1990, and to mark the start of works on site for the Mandela8 memorial in Princes Park, Liverpool 8. The special memorial will honour the struggles, achievements and life of the revolutionary South African leader.

The city of Liverpool has a long-standing affiliation with the work of Nelson Mandela, dating as far back as the early 1980s. The city, and in particular Liverpool 8, fought in unity with numerous anti-apartheid marches and boycotted many South African products, as well as supporting the free Nelson Mandela Campaign.

Registration required

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At the end of 2017, 68.5 million people around the world were forcibly displaced as a result of persecution, conflict or generalised violence with 25.4 million becoming refugees. The vast majority of refugees do not reach Europe, but at a time when providing protection and support to those forced to leave everything behind is more needed than ever, Governments across Europe have introduced policies to prevent, or to try to deter, entry into their countries. Alongside this hostile ‘strategy’, the treatment of those who do make it to Europe is deteriorating. The lecture will explore how policies relating to asylum-seekers and refugees in the UK and in other European countries serve both to obstruct entry - to build walls not bridges - and to place those who do manage to arrive at a profound disadvantage when trying to rebuild their lives.

Dr Lisa Doyle is the Executive Director of Advocacy and Engagement at the Refugee Council. She joined the organisation in 2005 and is responsible for leading the charity’s campaigning, media, parliamentary, policy, research and community engagement work. She has undertaken research on a variety of issues that affect refugees and people seeking asylum. Lisa was awarded a PhD in Geography from the University of Reading and she previously lectured in Human Geography at the University of Sussex. She is currently the representative for Western Europe on the Board of the European Council for Refugees and Exiles.

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