Update for Monday 11th June 2018

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As part of the Eleanor Rathbone Social Justice public lecture series 17/18, Jimmy McGovern will be delivering his lecture: 'What I wrote and why I wrote it'.

Kelvin MacKenzie, the ex-editor of The Sun, is no idiot. Shortly after the Hillsborough football stadium disaster in April 1989, the ‘newspaper’ carried an infamous headline - ‘The Truth’ - under which there were three subheadings: ‘Some fans picked pockets of victims’; ‘Some fans urinated on the brave cops’; and, ‘Some fans beat up PCs giving the kiss of life’. It is important to remember that MacKenzie expected that front page to be believed and that he had every right to expect it: 1989 was the culmination of a decade-long attack on working class culture and institutions. If you were a white working class male you were despised. If you were a white working class male football fan, you were even more despised. And if you were all those things and a ‘Scouser’ on top, God help you! And this contempt didn't just come from the reactionary right; it came from the Guardian reading left too.

By drawing on previous work including ‘Hillsborough’ (that centred the disaster), ‘Cracker’ (a crime drama series), ‘Sunday’ (on ‘Bloody Sunday’ in Derry), ‘Dockers’ (about the 1995-1998 Liverpool Docks Dispute) and Common (a drama about the iniquities of the common law of joint enterprise), this talk will explore fundamental questions of justice and injustice.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Humanise invites people of all genders, race, age, status, belief and background to come together as one; a unique take on canteen dining, strangers can enjoy each others company over good, whole, hearty food.

We are truly focusing on collaboration and community with Humanise. Alongside every one of you that are invited, we will be inviting a long list of local charity, non-for-profit, voluntary, and community organisations to also join us. Spending an evening with old and new friends alike, we hope to develop our understandings of the people around us.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

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The impact of technological changes have been identified as one of the ‘Grand Challenges’ in the Government’s national Industrial Strategy. Locally, there is a growing debate about the impact that future digital developments will have on the skills that will be needed in the Liverpool City Region (LCR) and the impact on the economy more broadly. The Centre for Cities 2018 Outlook recognises that while technological change will bring significant opportunities to increase prosperity and jobs in cities, it found that 1 in 5 existing jobs in British cities are likely to be displaced by 2030.

In the light of the growing importance of this debate locally, this seminar, run jointly by the Liverpool City Region's Combined Authority and the University of Liverpool’s Heseltine Institute as part of the programme of events for the International Business Festival, will discuss the digital revolution in the LCR and why it is important. It will ask which skills are needed in the digital economy and whether the LCR has those skills, and if there are digital skills gaps, what they are and how can they be filled? It will also ask what developments in the digital economy will drive demand for different skills in the future.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Professor Sethu Vijayakumar, from the University of Edinburgh, will deliver the third in a series of annual public lectures at this evening event.

The next generation of robots are going to work much more closely with humans, other robots and interact significantly with the environment around it. This talk will introduce powerful machine learning technologies that are enabling us to reap the benefits of increased autonomy while still feeling securely in control.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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To tackle the challenges faced by our public services, we need to learn to ‘think like a system and act like an entrepreneur’.

The RSA and the Heseltine Institute for Public Policy, Practice and Place have joined forces to invite you to a lively and thought-provoking free event to explore what it means in practice to ‘think like a system, act like an entrepreneur’ and to consider the barriers and enablers of systemic change in public services.

Without a rebalancing, public services could be increasingly ill-suited and unresponsive to the complex and networked world we live in. In many places, public sector staff are actively trying to effect this rebalancing while working within the constraints of an inflexible system. This is a tough ask.

But could a new approach enable public servants to adapt to an environment of complexity, uncertainty, and nonlinearity - and make change within it? The RSA is experimenting with a framework that has two core imperatives. First is to recognise the complexity involved in understanding the bigger picture. Second is to seek a flexible, iterative response to this complex and uncertain social context, pinpointing and pursuing opportunities for sustainable change that will make a difference to people’s lives. We call this method ‘think like a system and act like an entrepreneur’.

Registration required.

View on thersa.org

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This session will include perspectives from academia, business and charities regarding the latest research on ethical sourcing and responsible supply chain governance. The obligations arising from the Modern Slavery Act and examples of best practice in reporting will be discussed. Professor Balch will present the latest evidence on what businesses are doing in their statements on modern slavery and how some are choosing to go beyond the minimum obligations - using the issue to rejuvenate the ethical identity/health of their business.

This event is part of the International Business Festival 2018.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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CSIS Public Lecture with Professor Manisha Sinha, Draper Chair in American History, University of Connecticut. This talk explores the central role of slave resistance in the emergence and development of the abolition movement in the United States from the American Revolution to the Civil War.

Overturning the conventional image of abolitionists as white bourgeois reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism, it argues that slave resistance radicalized abolitionist ideology and tactics.

The relationship between slave rebellions and runaways and the American antislavery was proximate and continuous. Fugitive slave abolitionists provided the best riposte to the proslavery argument and came to lead the abolition movement on the eve of the Civil War.

The actions of slave runaways laid the foundations of the emancipation process during the war when thousands of slaves defected to Union Army lines.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk