Update for Monday 21st May 2018

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Ignite showcases Liverpool's movers and shakers, creators, thinkers, tinkers, innovators and doers, makers and dreamers in a fast paced format designed to inspire.

Registration required.

View on igniteliverpool.com

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When Theresa May called a snap General Election in 2017 Steve Howell, Labour’s new Deputy Director of Strategy and Communications, had barely been cleared for a parliamentary pass. Hear Howell’s inside story of the most dramatic General Election of modern times, in conversation with The Liverpool Echo’s Political Editor Liam Thorp.

Although the Conservative Party won the General Election of 2016, it was Labour’s result that hit the news. Written off as no-hopers under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, they took the pundits, and even themselves by surprise. But what goes on behind the scenes, in the machination of party politics which drives the parties forward? Join WoWFEST18 and Steve Howell for a fascinating inner glimpse into one of the most hotly contested elections of our time.

Ticket required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

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Massive resources have been directed to improving global health since the late 1990s. Investment by donor states and philanthropists is matched by increased attention from political leaders, policy makers and international relations experts. Diseases in one country, like Ebola, are seen as threatening stability and security more widely. As dense governance regimes have emerged to meet global health challenges and to ensure that the new money is well spent. They evaluate these measures in universalist terms: with reference to human rights, medical science and public health. By default, they assume that norms are simply diffused out from Washington and Geneva and mechanically implemented in the states of the global south.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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As part of the Eleanor Rathbone Social Justice public lecture series 17/18, Sir James Lawrence Munby will be delivering his lecture: ‘What is Family Law? Securing social justice for children and young people’

Sir James Lawrence Munby was called to the bar at Middle temple in 1971 and he practiced as a barrister in New Square Chambers, London. He was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1988 and as a High Court Judge in 2000, assigned to the Family Division and authorized to sit in the Administrative Court. In 2009, Sir James was appointed as Chairperson of the Law Commission and, later the same year, he was appointed a Lord Justice of Appeal. In 2013, he became President of the Family Division. Throughout his career Sir James has repeatedly highlighted failures and shortcomings in the justice and care systems. In 2002, he delivered a judgment relating to the treatment and conditions of children in penal custody in which he referred to ‘matters which, on the face of it, ought to shock the conscience of every citizen’. More recently, in 2017, he opined that the nation would have ‘blood on its hands’ if a NHS hospital bed could not be found for a teenage girl who was deemed to be at acute risk of taking her own life.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Creativity is at the heart of everything we do, both as children and adults. However, we have become a society that prescribes structured creativity rather than letting us explore the possibilities of thinking freely, with no agenda or reasoning. The current UK Waterstones Children’s Laureate, Lauren Child, will argue that children (and adults) should be allowed to dream and to let their creative minds run free in order to explore the true benefits of creativity for emotional support and connectivity to the wider world. Creativity, as Lauren sees it, is a life changer.

It is increasingly accepted that a lack of creative outlet has a negative impact on our mental health - but while children learn through playing, we don’t let ourselves have this space as adults. Idle time to experiment and enjoy - to do things for the sheer pleasure of doing them has been squeezed out of our lives and, Child will argue, we need it back.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk