Update for Monday 16th April 2018

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"Having spent most of my working life in either politics or education, I sometimes see the two as inextricably linked. I know that this is a view that wouldn’t be shared by some others and the campaign to ‘take politics out of education’ has probably grown in strength over recent years.

Whilst I would defend a strong relationship between the two, I feel equally strongly that the boundaries between the world of politics and schools are poorly defined and damage both areas of public life. The talk will consider the relationship between politics and schools and explore what a new settlement might look like."

Registration required.

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With the recent developments around disability equality, discrimination, and intersectionality, this conference aims to bring together experts in the field of disability equality, mental health and wellbeing to debate the key issues.

You will explore tangible solutions and ideas for change in your organisation as you work to promote inclusivity and respect for all.

With an increasing number of calendar days lost to sickness absence and stress, the speakers and the audience will in particular explore and debate how managers, lecturers and organisations can better support staff to have a sense of belonging, enjoy work and contribute more.

The debate will also consider whether or not the Equality Act 2010 has delivered on Disability Equality and Mental Health. The specialist Keynote speakers will share best practice - providing practical and workable solutions for public, private, education, health, and voluntary sector organisations.

Registration required.

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Caroline Bergvall is a writer, artist and vocal performer of French-Norwegian origins, based in London. She works across languages, art forms and media and is an exponent of interdisciplinary art, developing writing methods adapted to contemporary audiovisual and contextual concerns and multilingual identities and histories. Her language-based pieces revisit literary models, tackling difficult or violent historical and political events. Projects include performances, installations, books, audio pieces, graphic and printed work.

Registration required.

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Careful Management or Wilful Mistreatment: Liverpool’s World Heritage Site... in the balance?

World Heritage Day will bring speakers to RIBA North to speak to Merseyside Civic Society about World Heritage Status and to introduce a new Green Paper asking about six terms of policy:

Integrated approach
Nature and spirit of the city
Education, interpretation and involvement
Imaginative proposals
Consolidation and coherence
Both sides of the river

Trevor Skempton, an architect, artist and urban designer, based in North Wales and Liverpool will talk about his draft Green Paper on Liverpool's World Heritage site and ask for feedback and questions from the attendees.

Registration required.

View on merseysidecivicsociety.org

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This special event in conjunction with LJMU will be given by Dr. Ivan Olier a senior lecturer in data sciences.

There is no doubt that machine learning is reshaping our world. A field originated from artificial intelligence, machine learning aims at extracting knowledge from data and making predictions with minimal human intervention. We witness the use of machine learning every day. Online search, face detection, voice user interface, financial trading, healthcare, recommendation systems and smart cars are technologies where machine learning is at their core. However, little is said about how machine learning is revolutionising science, speeding up the rate of discoveries, while cutting the costs of experiments.

In this talk, Dr Ivan Olier will offer his insights into how recent scientific breakthroughs have benefited from machine learning, and what to expect in the coming years.

Registration required.

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Silvana Mandolessi (Professor of Cultural Studies at KU Leuven) - Memory as De-facement

The disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa in September 2014 brought about the biggest political crisis in Mexico in the last decade. It triggered a grass-root movement, with global reach, which denounced disappearances and other human rights violations that had been committed since the beginning of the ‘War on Drugs’. In the memory activism around the case, many practices and resources from the long history of enforced disappearance in Latin America were appropriated and recycled to adapt them to the Mexican context and new technologies.

In this talk Silvana will explore how classical symbols of disappearances were adapted to the digital era, focusing on “photographs” and particularly on the use of the face as a mnemonic device that became particularly prominent.

Registration required.

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The Screen School Research Seminar (LSSRS) The Liverpool Screen School Research Seminar is an interdisciplinary series of talks that explores the content, operation and impact of the media, the role of culture and identity in shaping public policy, and research methods in creative disciplines.

Dr Sharon Lockyer (Brunel University) will present a talk entitled: Stand-up Comedy as Disability Activism? Exploring the Creative Political Possibilities

Dr LockyerThe mainstream live stand-up comedy landscape has been transformed in recent years with an increasing number of disabled comedians performing. Despite this, little research focusses on disabled comedians, their performances and their audiences.

Registration required.

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Professor Rob Kitchin is ERC Advanced Investigator at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. He is principal investigator of the Programmable City project and co-PI of the Building City Dashboards project. He has published widely across the social sciences, including 26 authored/edited books and over 180 articles and book chapters. He was the editor-in-chief of the 12 volume, International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, and is presently editor of the journal, Dialogues in Human Geography. He was the 2013 recipient of the Royal Irish Academy's Gold Medal for the Social Sciences.

The smart city agenda is over a decade in the making, yet many cities are struggling to corral ICT-led initiatives into a smart city vision, to adapt existing city services to new technologies, and to drive forward a smart city strategy. Drawing upon a five year program of research conducted in Dublin and Boston, this lecture examines the adoption gap and points of resistance with respect to the rollout of smart city technologies. It argues that (1) smart city policy and deployment is hampered by a number of significant structural, institutional, political, ethical, practical and visioning issues that are fairly intractable and are set to slow on-going adoption; (2) these issues require critical reflection and redress through a reframing, reimagining and remaking of smart cities by its epistemic community and advocacy coalition.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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A distinguished panel of speakers will discuss how higher education can change the lives of some of the most disadvantaged children in Merseyside and what we can do as a University, and as a society, to make sure that no child is left behind.

In the 10 years since it was European Capital of Culture, Liverpool has enjoyed an economic, social and cultural revival. While investment can be seen in the city centre and historic waterfront, which welcome millions of tourists every year, areas such as Anfield in the north of the city are being left behind and are still listed amongst the most deprived areas in the country.

At this year’s Fred Freeman lecture, our panel will explore the vital role that education plays in improving the lives of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, the importance of projects such as IntoUniversity North Liverpool, and the wider social benefits that education can bring by driving the regeneration of deprived communities.

Registration required.

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The OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities (HCNM) was established twenty five years ago as an instrument to prevent conflicts related to inter-ethnic matters. Over the years, its role has evolved from an early warning tripwire to one of long term, structural conflict prevention. More specifically, it has focused on assisting countries in devising sound policies to guarantee minorities’ access to education, justice and participation, and, more in general in managing diverse societies. In his keynote speech, High Commissioner Zannier will provide an overview of the evolution of the HCNM mandate, as well as an insight into current geographic and thematic priorities and most prominent challenges

Registration required.

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Eyebrows are a constant in the press and online, with many different opinions about whose works and whose doesn’t. We want to get away from the eyebrow shaming and challenge the current negative press around the brow.

Come along to FACT on Saturday 28th April to shake off the brow negativity, and tell us what your brow means to you. We want to know more about the choices you make when you pluck, sculpt, and position your brows.

The day will feature:

Eyebrow 3D Scanning

A Brow Booth – Sketch and Shape your ‘perfect’ brow in our photo & video booth

Tea & Cake provided by The Garden Café

This event aims to gather stories and ideas to co-design and formulate a new taxonomy of the eyebrow where none currently exists.

The aim is to open up a city-wide conversation around why the eyebrow is a highly resonant marker of identity and its relationship to gender, class, race and sexuality.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk