Update for Monday 26th March 2018

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For LJMU's Athena Lecture Series, this year’s special guest is the award winning Samira Ahmed who will present a lecture around the International Women's Day 2018 campaign theme '#PressforProgress'.

With the recent developments nationally around gender equality, discrimination against women generally, intersectionality and visibility of women from other protected characteristics, gender pay gap and reporting, we are told we shouldn't be complacent and we must '#Pressforchange'.

Samira, has been passionate about inclusivity and promotion throughout her career and will be talking about her own experiences, how she was able to navigate her way to a successful role in the media. Samira will share her top tips for career progression.

Ticket required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Whilst Philip Courtenay periodically refreshes the video content of his Re:LODE installation (created with Yellow House), he invites people to participate in the process, contributing to the work’s themes of human geography, geopolitics and digital communication.

Registration required.

View on thebluecoat.org.uk

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Join astrophysicist and Liverpool alumnus, Dr Matt Taylor (MPhys Physics 1997), from the European Space Agency when he returns to Liverpool next month to talk about the early results from the historic Rosetta Mission - the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted.

The Rosetta probe was launched in 2004 carrying the Philae lander module which, a decade later and thanks to a gravity-assisted swing around Mars, become the first spacecraft to successfully land on a comet’s nucleus.

The mission proper came to an end in 2016 when the Rosetta probe, out of range of solar power as the comet took it further from the sun, was crash-landed onto the comet’s surface.

In this lecture, Matt will talk about the notable results from the mission, as well as the potential impact that the collected data could make to our understanding of comets.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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A public lecture by Professor Giovanna Tinetti of University College London as part of EWASS/NAM 2018.

The Earth is special to us - it’s our home. But is it really special as a planet? Every star we can see in the night sky is likely to be orbited by planets. There are probably a thousand billion planets in our galaxy alone. In about twenty years, over 3500 'exoplanets' have been discovered in distant solar systems.

There are planets completing a revolution around their mother star in less than one day, as well as planets orbiting two or even three stars or moving on trajectories so eccentric as to resemble comets. Some of them are freezing cold, some are so hot that their surface is molten. But beyond that our knowledge falters: What are they made of? How did they form? What’s the weather like there? Are they habitable? Finding out why these new worlds are as they are and what is the Earth’s place in our galaxy and - ultimately - in the universe, is one of the key challenges of modern astrophysics.

Giovanna Tinetti is Professor of Astrophysics at University College London where she coordinates a research team on extrasolar planets.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Merseyside Astronomy Day provides a chance to hear about the cutting edge research being done by some of the world's leading astrophysicists.

Speakers from universities and observatories around the world will present four talks during the day and make up a panel of experts ready to answer your questions.

Ticket required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk