Update for Monday 4th December 2017

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The Annual John Percival Postgate Lecture with Professor Greg Woolf.

In this lecture, Professor Greg Woolf will discuss the history of the shifting and tangled relationship between imperialism and religious change at Rome. This is the period so brilliantly illuminated by the religious thought of Cicero that it has sometimes seemed typical of classical Republican religion. Woolf's argument is that the reverse is true, that this period is exceptional in a series of ways that makes it possible to speak of religious fundamentalism at Rome, or a temporary closing of the Roman religious mind.Greg Woolf is a cultural historian of the Roman Empire and surrounding regions. Much of his work uses social theory to connect archaeological and historical information about antiquity. Since January 2015, he has been the Director of the Institute of Classical Studies, and Professor of Classics at the University of London.

Registration required.

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The event brings together scholars from within and without Liverpool to present current research on political violence and violence as a social and political phenomenon. Papers will cover political violence in France in the interwar period, terror and gender, colonial violence and body [and provisional organisations in Northern Ireland]. The event provide an opportunity to discuss a range of current academic approaches to political violence and make connections across disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Dr Chris Millington is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Swansea. His research explores violence in France between 1918-1940.
Dr Clare Bielby is Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Women’s Studies in York University. Her research explores the relationship between terrorism and gender and violence, subjectivity and affect.
Dr Deana Heath is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Liverpool and her research explores colonial violence and the body.

Registration required.

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When the richest 8 people in the world have as much wealth as the poorest half of the world’s population (Oxfam, 2017), it is a fitting time to address social justice and injustice in the economic sphere. Economic justice concerns not only what people are allowed to get (distributive justice), but also what they are allowed or required to do and contribute (contributive justice), and what they are allowed to control. The lecture will adopt a moral economic approach to assess the justifications of current economic arrangements. It will show how the distribution of wealth has become increasingly dysfunctional, unjust and environmentally unsustainable.

Andrew Sayer is Professor of Social Theory and Political Economy at Lancaster University. His work focuses mainly on inequality, well-being and ethics in everyday life, drawing upon philosophy as well as social science. His books include: The Moral Significance of Class (2005); Why Things Matter to People: Social Science, Values and Ethical Life (2011) and, most recently, Why We Can’t Afford the Rich (2014).

Registration required.

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How is new technology changing sport and what role are women playing?
What is the role of women within an industry that combines two male-dominated sectors; technology and sport? Our panel brings together some of the North West's premier women working within sports and technology to kick off our discussion.

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Metastasis is responsible for over 90% of cancer-related deaths. In order for cancer cells to spread, they need to adapt to the environment they encounter. Their research aims to understand how cancer cells navigate cancer remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM) and how changes in ECM composition and topology can drive tumorigenesis. Their work is multidisciplinary and takes advantage of various imaging modalities to understand cancer cell migration and ECM remodeling in vivo and ex vivo.

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Despite a turn away from the 'national' in much contemporary film analysis, discourses of the 'national' continue to structure the ways in which films are categorised, funded and rendered eligible for state support. By focusing upon the history of British film policy, this paper will consider how legal definitions of a ‘British’ film have informed both economic and cultural policy objectives and facilitated a range of film production. In doing so, the presentation will not only indicate how ‘national’ discourses and practices have continued to structure the economic and cultural dynamics of contemporary 'British’'filmmaking but also, due to the ways in which nationality has been defined, to support - as much as oppose - 'transnational' and globalising trends.

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Oneiromancy, or dream interpretation, is one of the divinatory arts with the longest history of attestation in ancient Egypt, from at least the Ramesside to the Roman Period. Regarded by the Egyptians as a science, this discipline is not only indirectly attested in official or daily-life documents, but also in specimens of the technical literature governing it: dream books. In these texts, thousands of dreams were described and interpreted as signs of events that were expected to befall the dreamer. Until recently, only a small number of dream books was available to scholars. Since 2010, increasing interest in divination has however led to the identification of additional specimens of dream books, significantly expanding the available corpus. With dream books known from the New Kingdom, the Late, and the Graeco-Roman Period, it is now possible to gauge both the continuity and the developments in the tradition of these manuals, including its twilight during Coptic Late Antiquity. Not only do these texts inform us about the theory and practice of oneiromancy, but they also offer material for the study of the contemporary society and psychology––for they include information on the way the ancient Egyptians categorized the world of dreams, as well as on the hopes and anxieties that they faced in their daily existence, and which are illustrated in the predictions interpreting each dream.

Registration required.

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