Update for Monday 6th November 2017

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Ignite showcases Liverpool's movers and shakers, creators, thinkers, tinkers, innovators and doers, makers and dreamers in a fast paced format designed to inspire.

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Our polar environments are experiencing some of the fastest rates of climate change globally. To monitor and understand the impact of these changes on marine life, we need to know what species live there, and what they do.

Maddie Brasier, University of Liverpool, surveys and studies the animals that live on the deep sea floor around Antarctica. Maddie uses genetic and biochemical analyses to answer ecological questions and consider the impacts of environmental change on marine communities.

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Social value as a "force for good" is rarely contested, yet despite near-universal acceptance of its ambition, the reality of implementing a social value agenda in practice can be full of conflict, tension, and challenges. More importantly, it often fails to drive systemic reductions of poverty and inequity. Drawing on research in the social housing sector, we explore the need for organisations to position their social value agenda as part of a wider eco-system (e.g. Northern Powerhouse or the Liverpool Social Economy). The challenges of a collaborative systems approach in practice, particularly around sub-optimisation of the parts to enable contribution to the ‘greater good’, are discussed. Social value demands a wholesale buy-in to the ethos, and a collaborative approach across a region. We illustrate the tensions, challenges and opportunities to drive and sustain positive social impact, through the case of Equity Housing Group, our partner in this research project.

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What happens when an ice sheet warms up? The world’s leading glaciologists and climate scientists have been pondering this simple question for over two decades. Their answer… it’s definitely been getting smaller but very difficult to precisely predict its long-term future.

To be fair it is a much more difficult question to answer that it might appear. It’s hardly surprising to know that as the climate warms, the ice melts more. But where is that melt happening? How much of the meltwater refreezes? Where and when does the meltwater reach the bed of the ice sheet? How much of the melt reaches the sea and actually raises global sea levels? As the climate warms, the ice sheet also accumulates more snow, it slides across its bed more quickly in the summer, and where the ice reaches the sea it breaks up into huge icebergs. How will all these processes be affected by continued warming and what is their combined effect on the long-term future of ice sheet? All these processes make the answer to our simple question much less straightforward, but much more fascinating.

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