Update for Monday 23rd October 2017

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The University of Liverpool and Liverpool John Moores University, are proud to be in collaboration to celebrate Black History Month and present Dr. Nicola Rollock as the key note speaker. Dr. Nicola Rollock will be discussing: "White Privilege: What is it and does it really exist in UK higher education?"

Registration required.

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The first "What's the Future..." panel discussion on the topic of 3D Printing technology (aka Additive Manufacturing) will be joined by a fantastic panel of experts on the subject of 3D Printing technology, its applications and limitations, and the philosophical and ethical considerations of this technology. This event is open to all ages and there is no need to have any background knowledge in Engineering or 3D printing to come along.

Registration required.

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As part of the Liverpool Irish Festival, the Institute of Irish Studies hosts renowned BBC Correspondent, Orla Guerin (BBC’s Egypt Correspondent), who will speak about her experiences reporting from conflict zones around the world. Orla covered the Soviet Union’s break up for Irish State Broadcaster RTÉ and has been working for the BBC since 1995, reporting from the Middle East, South Africa and Pakistan.

Registration required.

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This one-day workshop will be held on Friday 27th October 2017 at the University of Liverpool, with support from the Royal Historical Society and the Centre for the Study of International Slavery.

This workshop is being held at a profoundly turbulent moment in American history, life and politics. Debates over Confederate monuments and the memory of slavery continue to rage, and activist movements, such as the M4BL, have demonstrated that the struggle for human and civil rights remains at the very heart of the American experience.

This workshop is designed to open up a dialogue between those in universities and beyond. Participants will discuss the history of slavery in the U.S., its continuing legacy and memory, and the best ways to communicate and represent its histories and impacts. Panels will explore America’s violent pasts and legacies, new approaches to the study of US slavery, slavery as represented in film, and the communication and commemoration of the institution. There will be a screening and discussion of 1745: An Untold Story of Slavery, a short film that tells the story of two enslaved sisters who escaped into the wilds of eighteenth-century Scotland.

Registration required.

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Unveiling a number of discrete, yet important case histories of Liverpool, Liverpool Irish and/or Irish women, In:Visible Women’s morning sessions set the scene for exploring the issues women still face today, particularly in certain Irish communities. By recognising their influence and impact we aim to redress their abilities and attributes. Discussions move to more difficult issues in the afternoon and could include discussion around shamed pregnancies, arranged marriages, faith crises, institutional abuse, secret adoptions and illegal abortions; many of which retain influence and impact on families and communities today and are highlighted elsewhere in the festival programme. Whilst the laws in the Irish Republic, Northern Ireland and mainland Great Britain still allow 11 women per day to travel to England to have their ‘shame dealt with’ these issues are not just a matter for women, but for society, legislature and reconciliation and so the late afternoon sessions will consider this.

In:Visible Women builds relationships with artists, academics and organisations to deliver illuminating talks, films, performances, artworks and written features to start making ‘invisible’ women’s issues, visible. Piloting this year is our In:Visible Women day at Central Library. Artists and academics will highlight individual, historic case studies, bringing to light diminished or overlooked histories and stories. After an enlightening day of discussion, imagery, installations and film, will be an an evening of Liverpool, Liverpool Irish and Irish female singer songwriters at the Liverpool Philharmonic Music Room, showcasing a raft of contemporary talent.

Ticket required.

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Feminists have struggled for human rights in Colombia for many years, in order to achieve recognition and redistribution for women in the economic, political and cultural spheres. Feminists have also contributed to building peace. Feminist campaigning during the last peace process between the FARC-EP and government of Juan Manuel Santos led to the creation of a Gender Sub-Commission. This campaigning also led to the inclusion of a gender perspective into the Final Agreement signed in November 2016.

However, in the referendum of October 2016, citizens voted to refuse a peace deal partly because of the gender approach. What caused this? What were the consequences? What challenges do women face during Colombia's transitional phase?

In this event, Erika Rodríguez Gómez will talk about her experience as a human rights defender and will share her reflections about the current situation in Colombia.

Registration required.

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Professor Mary Hickman chairs a Votes for Irish Citizens Abroad panel in the morning. The discussion and Q&A highlights the rights held by the Irish diaspora currently, what future referenda are considering and what Irish citizenship means/could mean – today and in future.

Registration required.

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Following the success of last year’s Lily and Poppy event, The Institute of Irish Studies is delighted to continue this strand of its collaboration with the Liverpool Irish Festival. This year, Universtiy of Liverpool will be hosting Northern Irish politicians Dawn Purvis (former leader, Progressive Unionist Party) and Elisha McCallion (MP for Foyle and former Mayor of Derry, Sinn Féin), who will discuss the role of women in reconciliation, particularly within Ireland. The discussion will be chaired by Dr Diane Urquhart (Reader, The Institute of Irish Studies)

Registration required.

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The Heseltine Institute for Public Policy and Practice is holding the latest in their public policy seminar series on Monday 30 October. To be discussed will be Brexit - focusing on European regional policy - with the University of Liverpool colleague, Dr Olivier Sykes. Dr Sykes is an expert in urban and regional planning and has written extensively on the subject and presented his work at events throughout Europe. A short extract from his latest paper:

"Things we lost in the fire" - remembering the past and future of European regional policy in the UK

The EU's regional policy evolved partly as a response to the distinctive needs of the UK following its accession to the European Economic Community in the 1970s and remains a key and well-regarded 'British contribution' to the present-day European Union (EU). This rarely acknowledged reality and the aftermath of the UK's EU referendum in 2016 form the backdrop to this presentation. Firstly, the position of EU regional policy within the wider 'European Project' is discussed; secondly, the material, symbolic and political impacts that it has had on Britain's regions and communities over the past four decades are reviewed; thirdly, the outcome of the UK's 2016 European Union referendum is explored from a territorial perspective; and, fourthly, the future prospects for place-based policy in Britain are considered. The presentation concludes by emphasising the pivotal role that EU regional policy has played in the UK in addressing and mitigating acute territorial development challenges, and calling for close attention to be paid over the coming years to the distributional spatial impacts of any changed UK relationship with the EU.

Registration required.

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Speaker: Minja Yang: former Deputy Director of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Paris and Director of the UNESCO WHS Regional Office in Delhi, currently President and Professor at Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium

Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City has been declared by UNESCO to have features of outstanding universal value, which puts Liverpool in the Premier League of world cities. With the status under threat, our 2017 seminar series asks if we have sufficiently valued what being a UNESCO World Heritage Site confers.

Entitled “Liverpool UNESCO World Heritage Site – A Status worth fighting for?” this free seminar series will bring UNESCO heritage officials to venues within Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City – currently inscribed on UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger.

Registration required.

View on engageliverpool.com