Update for Monday 16th October 2017

This is an online archive of our weekly newsletter.

Don't miss out - sign up to receive a carefully filtered list of events each week.

at

As part of the responsibilities and commitment to challenging and responding to hate crime as effectively as possible Cobalt Housing, LHT, Steve Biko Housing Association and the Anthony Walker Foundation (AWF), and other partners have been working to update the Joint Agency Hate Crime Minimum Service Standards providing details of how housing providers can ensure service users are provided with a response and the support they would expect.

Additionally AWF has been working in partnership with the University of Liverpool and Interchange to have ‘Eradicating Hate Crime: Merseyside’s Partnership Strategy’ launched in 2014 independently reviewed by a research student study sociology, criminology and social policy. This research has now been completed and key findings and recommendations will be presented the same morning.

Speakers will include the Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner, Emily Spurrell and Thomas Hilbig (research student responsible for review of Partnership Strategy).

The re-launch and the strategy review will assist in re-energising the efforts to effectively tackle hate crime and ensuring anyone experiencing it would be able to access the services and responses they would expect. Organisations already involved and signed up to the Minimum Service Standards and Partnership Strategy will be encouraged to reflect on their practises and how they are maintaining pace with the ever changing needs and concerns that can arise from events locally, nationally and globally.

Hate crime is of serious concern for all, for those experiencing and affected by it, for those who have responsibility to respond and support, and for those with a role to help stop it from happening. The event is open to all and will provide an opportunity for fresh impetus, smarter and improved partnerships and identify key priorities in the years ahead.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Since Dolly first made headlines in 1996, what have the last two decades taught us about genetic cloning?

Following in her footsteps, there now stands a unique flock of cloned sheep, all derived from the same cell line as Dolly. The affectionately named 'Nottingham Dollies' are currently under the care of Professor Kevin Sinclair, an expert in developmental biology at The University of Nottingham.

On Tuesday 17 October, Professor Sinclair brings his expert knowledge to The University of Liverpool to deliver the next Science & Society lecture 'What have we learnt from Dolly the Sheep (and Debbie, Denise & Diane)?'

Kevin Sinclair, PhD, DSc is Professor of Developmental Biology at the University of Nottingham. His lab investigates metabolic programming during early mammalian development, where epigenetic outcomes are determined in embryonic cells and tissues, and long-term developmental consequences assessed in offspring. Studies include work with rodents, farm animals and humans.

After the lecture there will be a Q&A Session, followed by an informal drinks and networking session.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

at

Part of Engage Liverpool Seminar Series 2017

Speaker: Michael Turner UNESCO Chair in Urban Design and Conservation Studies at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem

Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City has been declared by UNESCO to have features of outstanding universal value, which puts Liverpool in the Premier League of world cities. With the status under threat, our 2017 seminar series asks if we have sufficiently valued what being a UNESCO World Heritage Site confers.

Entitled “Liverpool UNESCO World Heritage Site – A Status worth fighting for?” this free seminar series will bring UNESCO heritage officials to venues within Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City – currently inscribed on UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger.

Registration required.

View on engageliverpool.com

at

The Low Carbon Eco-Innovatory (LCEI) team will be hosting a unique evening reception at The British Music Experience, located in the iconic Cunard Building on Liverpool's waterfront.

A year on from the launch last October, LCEI has successfully worked with over 70 Liverpool City Region SMEs to create or improve their products, processes or services in order to reduce the negative environmental impacts, resulting in both economic and environmental benefits to their business and the city region. The range of businesses they have supported is so vast; from biotechnology manufacturing and community interest companies to businesses developing new 'to market' eco-friendly products and breweries!

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

at

WoW’s latest book, Great War to Race Riots is about to be launched. It is about the story of a unique archive of letters and documents from 1919-1920 which highlight the plight of black seafarers, soldiers and workers who supported the ‘mother country’ during the WW1. The archive contains the words of the men themselves in letters to Liverpool’s Lord Mayor, which were written against the back-drop of institutionalised racism, competition for jobs, and racial tensions which exploded into rioting on the streets of Liverpool in 1919. Great War to Race Riots, written by WoW’s Co-Director, Madeline Heneghan and local author, Emy Onuora (Pitch Black), is the culmination of in-depth research conducted by the Heritage Lottery funded Great War to Race Riots Archive Group. This dedicated team devoted their time and energies to uncovering the lost voices of these men who helped to shape Liverpool’s black community and contributed to Britain’s development.

This event also marks the launch of WoW’s first ever Black History Month Festival.

Ticket required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

AHRC ‘Translating Cultures’ theme, Centre for the Study of International Slavery and UNESCO Chair in Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts are delighted to present a workshop on coming to terms with our common histories.

The transatlantic slave trade, colonialism and the impacts of the British Empire -- are all shared by different people and locations. There are difficulties surrounding modern discourses on these shared histories where in many cases, places and people who continue to be enriched by the wealth created and maintained through slavery and its legacies find it uncomfortable to engage in accepting and addressing implications today of these shared histories.

The workshop explores the ways that the Arts can be deployed as a way of creating new spaces and opportunities to remove the discomfort of historical and modern injustice and inequalities that are a result of slavery, colonialism – and the reluctance to discuss these.

It is important to stress that there continues to be a pressing need to create new opportunities that allow young people especially, to explore possibilities of shaping their shared futures in a manner that draws on our shared histories into a positive direction. How do we facilitate these opportunities through international artistic collaboration?

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

As part of WoW’s Black History Month celebrations, there will be a historical walking tour of the L1 area, exploring a forgotten yet integral part of Liverpool’s cultural and racial history. Inspired by the hugely successful Great War to Race Riots Archive project and our on-going ‘Black Lives and Legacies 1919’ project, in association with Liverpool University, our volunteers have researched and mapped a history yet to be recognised in mainstream accounts of our city’s well documented past.

The racial riots of 1919 were a watershed moment for Liverpool’s longstanding black community. On the night of 6th June 1919 unprecedented racial violence erupted in the modern day Chinatown area that would continue for for days as gangs of people, reportedly in the hundreds or thousands, hunted out “any black man they could find … severely beating and stabbing” them. Black homes and businesses were looted and wrecked as over 700 members of the black community were removed from their homes into the main Bridewell, for their own protection.

As these people were, despite of the colour of their skin, citizens of the British Empire they could not be forcibly removed from the UK, much to the chagrin of Liverpool Council and Central Governemnt. The post WW1 economic and social slump encouraged xenophobic feeling amongst the local population, perpetuated by the media. During 1919 there was an increase in racial violence in other port towns across mainland Britain including Glasgow,Cardiff and others that signified a global antipathy towards ethnic minorities: this was the height of the Klu Klux Klan across the Atlantic and a period in Chicago’s history known as ‘The Red Summer’.

Using official reports from the time, WoW and guests will trace the night of the 6th June 1919 visiting the residences of those involved as well as trailing the tragic last movements of Charles Wootton, a 24 year old Bermudan sailor and victim of the 1919 riots, who was chased by a mob and drowned in Queens Dock. He was either swept, thrown or jumped in but once the dock was pelted with rocks. Not a single person was charged in connection with his death and the coroner’s ruling at the time supported this injustice. On the tour we will visit the memorial plaque laid for Charles Wootton by historian David Olusoga just last year.

Then continuing on to trace the events of the week following Wootton’s death when large scale racial violence continued and spread into L8. The walking tour is just under 3 miles and accessible to all. The tour will finish at Toxteth Library just in time for a talk with David Olusoga about his award winning book Black and British.

The tour will begin at the Chinese Arch on Nelson Street at 1.30pm sharp.

Ticket required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Writing on the Wall and Waterstones present David Olusoga's Black and British: A Forgotten History as part of WoW's Black History Month mini Festival.

David Olusoga will explore and discuss the rich and revealing story of the long relationship between the British Isles and the people of Africa and the Caribbean. Unflinching, confronting taboos and revealing hitherto unknown scandals, David Olusoga describes how the lives of black and white Britons have been entwined for centuries. The book is an accompaniment to the highly acclaimed BBC2 series for which David Olusoga organised the commemorative plaque in memory of seafarer Charles Wootton who was murdered in Liverpool during the 1919 race riots.

Ticket required.

View on skiddle.com

at

The University of Liverpool and Liverpool John Moores University, are proud to be in collaboration to celebrate Black History Month and present Dr. Nicola Rollock as the key note speaker. Dr. Nicola Rollock will be discussing: "White Privilege: What is it and does it really exist in UK higher education?"

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

The first "What's the Future..." panel discussion on the topic of 3D Printing technology (aka Additive Manufacturing) will be joined by a fantastic panel of experts on the subject of 3D Printing technology, its applications and limitations, and the philosophical and ethical considerations of this technology. This event is open to all ages and there is no need to have any background knowledge in Engineering or 3D printing to come along.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

As part of the Liverpool Irish Festival, the Institute of Irish Studies hosts renowned BBC Correspondent, Orla Guerin (BBC’s Egypt Correspondent), who will speak about her experiences reporting from conflict zones around the world. Orla covered the Soviet Union’s break up for Irish State Broadcaster RTÉ and has been working for the BBC since 1995, reporting from the Middle East, South Africa and Pakistan.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

at

Unveiling a number of discrete, yet important case histories of Liverpool, Liverpool Irish and/or Irish women, In:Visible Women’s morning sessions set the scene for exploring the issues women still face today, particularly in certain Irish communities. By recognising their influence and impact we aim to redress their abilities and attributes. Discussions move to more difficult issues in the afternoon and could include discussion around shamed pregnancies, arranged marriages, faith crises, institutional abuse, secret adoptions and illegal abortions; many of which retain influence and impact on families and communities today and are highlighted elsewhere in the festival programme. Whilst the laws in the Irish Republic, Northern Ireland and mainland Great Britain still allow 11 women per day to travel to England to have their ‘shame dealt with’ these issues are not just a matter for women, but for society, legislature and reconciliation and so the late afternoon sessions will consider this.

In:Visible Women builds relationships with artists, academics and organisations to deliver illuminating talks, films, performances, artworks and written features to start making ‘invisible’ women’s issues, visible. Piloting this year is our In:Visible Women day at Central Library. Artists and academics will highlight individual, historic case studies, bringing to light diminished or overlooked histories and stories. After an enlightening day of discussion, imagery, installations and film, will be an an evening of Liverpool, Liverpool Irish and Irish female singer songwriters at the Liverpool Philharmonic Music Room, showcasing a raft of contemporary talent.

Ticket required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

This one-day workshop will be held on Friday 27th October 2017 at the University of Liverpool, with support from the Royal Historical Society and the Centre for the Study of International Slavery.

This workshop is being held at a profoundly turbulent moment in American history, life and politics. Debates over Confederate monuments and the memory of slavery continue to rage, and activist movements, such as the M4BL, have demonstrated that the struggle for human and civil rights remains at the very heart of the American experience.

This workshop is designed to open up a dialogue between those in universities and beyond. Participants will discuss the history of slavery in the U.S., its continuing legacy and memory, and the best ways to communicate and represent its histories and impacts. Panels will explore America’s violent pasts and legacies, new approaches to the study of US slavery, slavery as represented in film, and the communication and commemoration of the institution. There will be a screening and discussion of 1745: An Untold Story of Slavery, a short film that tells the story of two enslaved sisters who escaped into the wilds of eighteenth-century Scotland.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Feminists have struggled for human rights in Colombia for many years, in order to achieve recognition and redistribution for women in the economic, political and cultural spheres. Feminists have also contributed to building peace. Feminist campaigning during the last peace process between the FARC-EP and government of Juan Manuel Santos led to the creation of a Gender Sub-Commission. This campaigning also led to the inclusion of a gender perspective into the Final Agreement signed in November 2016.

However, in the referendum of October 2016, citizens voted to refuse a peace deal partly because of the gender approach. What caused this? What were the consequences? What challenges do women face during Colombia's transitional phase?

In this event, Erika Rodríguez Gómez will talk about her experience as a human rights defender and will share her reflections about the current situation in Colombia.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Professor Mary Hickman chairs a Votes for Irish Citizens Abroad panel in the morning. The discussion and Q&A highlights the rights held by the Irish diaspora currently, what future referenda are considering and what Irish citizenship means/could mean – today and in future.

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

at

Following the success of last year’s Lily and Poppy event, The Institute of Irish Studies is delighted to continue this strand of its collaboration with the Liverpool Irish Festival. This year, Universtiy of Liverpool will be hosting Northern Irish politicians Dawn Purvis (former leader, Progressive Unionist Party) and Elisha McCallion (MP for Foyle and former Mayor of Derry, Sinn Féin), who will discuss the role of women in reconciliation, particularly within Ireland. The discussion will be chaired by Dr Diane Urquhart (Reader, The Institute of Irish Studies)

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk