Update for Monday 26th June 2017

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Speaker: Lisa Merrill, Professor, Department of Rhetoric & Performance Studies, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, USA (Ph.D., New York University)

Professor Merrill's ongoing research and publications are in the fields of performance studies, critical race and cultural studies, American studies, and women's and LGBTQ history. Her critical biography, When Romeo was a Woman: Charlotte Cushman and her Circle of Female Spectators (U of Michigan Press, 2000) was awarded the Joe A. Callaway Prize for Best Book on Drama or Theater.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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12.45: Welcome by Dr. David Fleming OBE, Director of National Museums Liverpool

12:50-1:05: Welcome by the Chair, Prof. Ian Wray, Visiting Professor in Civic Design and Visiting Fellow, Heseltine Institute, University of Liverpool
Ian Wray will welcome the speakers and introduce the proceedings by raising three important questions: why did the former regional development agency support the city’s bid for World Heritage Status; what has the city made of its designation; and what is the significance and impact of the statement of Outstanding Universal Value?

1:10 -1:40: Keynote address: Duncan Wilson OBE, Chief Executive, Historic England
Duncan Wilson will address the issues around the Liverpool WHS in its national context and some of the challenges that lie ahead, particularly the balance of heritage conservation with the future and growing City economy.

1:45-2:05: Prof. Mike Robinson, Director, Ironbridge Institute, University of Birmingham
Mike Robinson will discuss Liverpool in the wider context of World Heritage Sites, particularly those in urban centres and the issues surrounding them nationally and internationally. He will provide an introduction into how we produce innovative and imaginative ways to understand and to translate the inter-relationships between heritage, tourism and culture.

2:55-3:30 Dr. David Fleming, Director of National Museums Liverpool
NML and How We Interpret Liverpool’s Cultural Heritage
David Fleming will place the work of National Museums Liverpool on the built heritage in a wider context.
Dr. Liz Stewart, Curator of Archaeology and the Historic Environment, National Museums Liverpool
Putting the Museum in its Place by Putting Places in the Museum
Case study of the Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project.

3:35-3:55: Paul Manning, Harcourt Developments
Case study – Titanic Hotel, Stanley Dock: an exemplary conservation and restoration of a Grade II* building.

4:00-4:20: Steve Parry, managing director Ion Development
Case study - Heritage-sensitive new build at Mann Island. Steve Parry will discuss the benefits and challenges of successfully developing within the World Heritage Site, its buffer zone and setting of listed assets.

4:25-4:45 Phil Redmond CBE
Cultural Partnership – Phil Redmond will address the role of heritage and its importance in the City’s cultural ambitions moving forward; the successes of integrating cultural activities, people and events within internationally famous Liverpool and its historic landmarks.

4:50-5:20: Questions for the panel and discussion
5:25-5:35: Next steps Prof. Lin Foxhall, University of Liverpool
5:40-5:45: Closing remarks from the Chair
5:45-6:45: Drinks reception

View on merseysidecivicsociety.org

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The research network Geopolitics, Law and International Relations at LJMU is hosting an interdisciplinary symposium on the geopolitical implications of Brexit.

Since the EU referendum, there has been debate on how the UK should define its role in the international community after leaving the EU.

As the UK is a significant player in international relations and the EU is a major global actor, Brexit is likely to have a profound geopolitical impact. This symposium will bring together academics, policy experts and practitioners to map out possible post-Brexit scenarios and to promote a better understanding of Brexit and its geopolitical consequences.

The symposium will examine the geopolitical context and implications of Brexit, and consider potential scenarios for the EU, the UK and the global order. It will examine a number of important questions. These include the new relationship between the UK and the EU, how Europe and the UK will deal with common concerns such as Russia’s resurgence in world affairs and the impact of a Trump presidency on UK-US relations and UK-Europe relations.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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"Whatever elected politicians - and other public office holders - may think, a huge gap has grown between them and the public they are there to serve. Over 50 years in public life have convinced me that this disconnect cannot, must not, be allowed to continue and that there are ways to address it."

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Diamond Light Source is the UK’s synchrotron. It works like a giant microscope, harnessing the power of electrons to produce bright light that scientists can use to study anything from fossils to jet engines to viruses and vaccines.

The machine speeds up electrons to near light speeds so that they give off a light 10 billion times brighter than the sun. These bright beams are then directed off into laboratories known as ‘beamlines’. Here, scientists use the light to study a vast range of subject matter, from new medicines and treatments for disease to innovative engineering and cutting-edge technology.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Roger Phillips will host an 'In Conversation' with Professor Peter Toyne, CBE DL, LJMU's first Vice Chancellor. Professor Toyne was Rector between 1986 and 1992 and Vice-Chancellor from 1992 to 2000.

Image of Professor Peter ToyneProfessor Toyne will be chatting about his time and experiences in Liverpool.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Is the era of the physical book and its traditional home, the library in a fixed building, at an end? Will the digital revolution simply do away with the library? Do we just keep libraries open out of nostalgia for an out of date artefact?

Alan Gibbons examines the history of the book, its resilience, the place of libraries in an age of austerity and the role of literacy in social mobility.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk