Update for Monday 8th May 2017

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Rotavirus diarrhoea kills almost half a million infants and young children each year. Rotavirus vaccines are being introduced into childhood immunisation programmes to reduce this unacceptable burden of disease. While evidence of their early impact in the Americas and Europe is striking, their greatest value in reducing childhood deaths in Africa and Asia is yet to be fully realised. This lecture will review major achievements in the global battle against rotavirus and explore remaining challenges to successful disease control.

Professor Cunliffe is Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Liverpool and Honorary Consultant Microbiologist, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.
He trained as a clinical microbiologist in Edinburgh and Liverpool and obtained a PhD from the University of Liverpool in 2001. His research interest is the epidemiology and prevention of diarrhoeal disease in children. Since the award in 1996 of a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in Clinical Tropical Medicine, Professor Cunliffe has led a long-term programme of rotavirus research in children in Malawi. This included a pivotal, Phase III clinical trial of human rotavirus vaccine which resulted in a global rotavirus vaccine recommendation by WHO.

Professor Cunliffe's work has been published in leading medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet and Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Registration required.

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This seminar will examine the socially constitutive force of historical racial violence, including dimensions and mechanisms of its lasting impact, remaining theoretical and empirical questions, and remedial implications. A growing body of work finds that areas of the United States marked by more pronounced histories of racial violence remain distinguished by elevated black victim homicide rates, white supremacist mobilization, support for punitive crime policy, school corporal punishment, and other violence and conflict today. These ‘haunting legacies’ are attributed to lingering traces in the psyches, identities, attitudes, behaviours, and structural relations of successive generations, yet underlying mechanisms are not well understood, and there remains a need for more direct and comparative analysis of these dynamics to inform remedial effort. To that end, I conclude with discussion of my comparative interests in the U.K. – including efforts to regulate racial abuse, and lasting impacts of these events – as elements of my engaged research on legacies of racial violence.
Registration required.

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The North West British Society of Criminology Seminar Series 2016-17, in conjunction with University of Liverpool’s International Criminological Research Unit (ICRU) and the BSC National Victims Network, present a Day Symposium on: Violence, Culture and Victimhood

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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The purpose in this talk will be to look backwards, over 28 years of case law and legislative reform since the judiciary first derived a ‘best interests’ test for the medical treatment of adults who lack capacity from the doctrine of necessity, and forwards, in order to advocate an even more participative model of decision-making than that which has already been developed in the Court of Protection. In particular, the speaker will consider whether it might be possible for the law’s binary threshold concept of capacity to be applied in practice so that it better reflects the reality that people exist on a spectrum of decision-making ability, or more precisely, on a spectrum as to how much support they need in order to make decisions.
Registration required.

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In the XXI century, microelectronics is pursuing the new More-Than-Moore strategy, where the number of different functionalities integrated in a chip is the added value, rather than the number of integrated bits. Zero-power, intelligent, autonomous systems featuring energy efficient sensing, computation and communication are fundamentals in the Internet-of-Things and Trillion-of-Sensors planets.
Come and learn about the evolution and revolution of energy efficient wearables that exploit autonomous systems with embedded wireless low power bio- and environmental- sensors for preventive life-style and healthcare.
Fernanda Irrera, Professor at the Electronics Department of the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, will talk about a smart wearable sensing system for the detection of motion symptoms of the Parkinson’s disease.
So, hear about wearable sensing system in action and then decide for yourself whether it is the transformative technology promised.

Talk abstract:
The utility of wearable sensors in the patient care, assistance and rehabilitation consists in new and still not fully explored opportunity offered by the generation of big amount of data which can be shared on Internet. Sensors can help monitor and mitigate the effects of disorders, customize the therapy and eventually activate feedback to patients and care-givers.
The health cost is dramatically increasing and remote home care emerges as a tornado in making to reduce health care cost. In the US, health cost reached $2.5 trillion in 2009, representing 18% of the GDP (EE Times 12/9/09). The market of wearable systems for healthcare today is approximately $12 billion.
Professor Irrera will talk about the latest technological advancements in the field of motion sensing for treatment of neurological patients affected by the Parkinson's Disease.

Registration required.

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Liverpool is rightly proud to be a place where world-renowned heritage sits alongside new developments and innovation that make it a truly 21st century international city. Recent changes have included a greater focus on the environment and a reduction in dangerous emissions, partly thanks to the move away from coal power. However, like most major conurbations, life in the city is still reliant on fuels that contribute to climate change.

Liverpool has hit its own targets to reduce emissions ahead of schedule, but in this event we ask what more can be done to make life here environmentally sustainable. The Low Carbon Liverpool project and the Mayor's Commission for Environmental Sustainability explored how the city can combine sustainability with quality and prosperity, but how can the new city region take further steps to become a global climate leader?

Registration required.

View on eventbrite.co.uk

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The Pint of Science festival comes to Liverpool on the 15th -17th May.

For three nights of amazing science, topics will be explored, such as the truth about e-cigarettes, chocolate addiction and whether microscopic worms could one day help cure dementia. Alongside the talks, they’ll also be live experiments, comedy, fun quizzes and the chance to win Pint of Science goodies.

Ticket required.

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FACT and Radical Film Network will hold a film-screening and panel event exploring the role of the filmmaker as activist. Seeking to counter the largely fictional (and often hysterically inaccurate) narrative on Syrian refugees put forward by the mainstream media, filmmaker Yannis Koufonikos questions how much of this narrative is fiction, constructing a positive representation of refugees and their struggles built around his work inside the Alexandria refugee camp in Greece.

(with a screening of 722 TMX Engineer Battalion)

Ticket required.

View on fact.co.uk

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Ignite showcases Liverpool's movers and shakers, creators, thinkers, tinkers, innovators and doers, makers and dreamers in a fast paced format designed to inspire.

Registration required.

View on igniteliverpool.com

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This session explores the migration emergency in Europe which is leading increased numbers of asylum-seekers and migrants to live informal lives in European towns and cities. Research carried out by Dr Arshad Isakjee at the University of Liverpool and other at institutions is starting to show how, in the absence of formal support, many migrants are resorting to constructing their own shelter and having to find ways to feed themselves and remain healthy. Living in informal camps such as the one in Calais can have profound impacts on the health of migrants – but it is also a symptom of a wider political crisis in which European countries are failing to adhere to liberal and humanitarian principles.

Registration required.

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Was 9/11 an inside job? Is climate change a hoax? Was Princess Diana murdered? Millions of people appear to think so, disbelieving official explanations for significant events in favour of alternative accounts that are often called ‘conspiracy theories’. In recent years, psychologists have begun to investigate what makes conspiracy theories appealing to so many people. In this talk, Prof. Karen Douglas will broadly overview what psychologists have found out so far, and will discuss some of her own findings on the causes and consequences of belief in conspiracy theories.

Karen Douglas is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent. In addition to conducting work on the psychology of conspiracy theories, she is involved in projects examining sexism in language, the influence of sexist ideology on attitudes toward pregnant women, and the psychology of internet behaviour.

Registration required.

View on merseysideskeptics.org.uk

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The Department of Geography and Planning host a viewing of Liverpool at sunset from the Roxby Building, which offers a unique perspective of the city. Search Google images and you’ll find plenty of pictures of the Liverpool skyline drenched in the rich light of a sunset. And its appeal is nothing new, with artists having long travelled to the city to capture the colour of its skies and landmarks. Come along to enjoy a panoramic view from the southern edge of our campus.

The Department welcomes guests to consider their city from a different vantage point and points in time. Historic maps and plans from our collection, and displays of our current research enable guests to consider the many visions of Liverpool. Displays of maps and plans will show the topography and development of the city. While current research projects suggest alternative perspectives, from geological past to post-colonial legacy and from founding street patterns to modern politics of regeneration in Liverpool.

The event will include interactive and family friendly activities to enable you to interpret and capture different visions of Liverpool and make your own mark on the City’s skyline.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk