Update for Monday 1st May 2017

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The notion of a 'healthy' diet that harks back to an idealised point in our prehistory has gained both high-profile support and significant criticism over the last decade. Hear how archaeological research is providing exciting insights into the evolution of human diet & health.

Prof. Keith Dobney, University of Liverpool, is a bio-archeologist. His research group explores the origins and spread of farming across the planet, and more recently has been reconstructing the evolution of human and Neanderthal diet and health from studies of their dental tartar.

Registration required.

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Abstract: In many western countries the organisation of policing is undergoing significant changes. Among the most important are the shift toward more specialised techniques of urban governance, and the increased pluralisation and networked character of policing. This has led to a situation where urban spaces increasingly are policed through complex networks that not only defy conventional public-private boundaries, but also gives rise to new modes of governance, by bringing together a multiplicity of governmental actors, authorities, perspectives and legal powers.

This presentation argues that one way to advance our understanding of current transformations of urban policing is by developing a more nuanced analysis of the legal mechanism and the everyday legal manoeuvres involved in network policing through space. The presentation uses an ethnography study of networked policing of Danish nightlife to explore how local ‘games of jurisdiction’ (between police, venue owners and bouncers), and strategic ‘scale shifting’ between different legal orders
(criminal law, administrative law and private trespasser acts), have become central to the enforcement of a police-promoted gang suppression strategy, aimed at transforming Danish nightlife into a no-go zone for gang-related individuals. By analysing how private authority and laws against trespassing paradoxically have become integral to police officers’ systematic exclusion of non-offending individuals from privately owned venues in Denmark, the presentation argues that a focus on local jurisdiction games is useful to highlight the at times unpredictable ways private and public legal powers are assembled and reassembled in network policing, giving rise to new forms of spatial governance but also to new challenges to citizens’ rights.

Registration required.

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The countries of the Northern Triangle of Central America, (Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras) are known as the “triangle of death” due to the high levels of homicides in these countries. Additionally, these countries are labelled as three of the most dangerous countries for a woman to live.

In this talk, guest speaker, Leda Lozier, looks at the narratives of gendered violence from the 1980’s to the present to propose a link between criminal violence and gender violence in the countries of the Northern Triangle.

Registration required.

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City of Life and Death: Chinese Traumas, Chinese Memories

As part of University of Liverpool’s Chinese Studies module "Projecting China: An Introduction to Chinese History and Cinema", Dr Leon Rocha presents a new film programme, The Cultural Politics of Chinese Cinema: From Wire-fu Fantasies to Historical Epics. Exploring propaganda, trauma and memory, and the globality of Chinese cinema, these three important films speak to different aspects of cultural politics in contemporary China.

The third film in this series, City of Life and Death (2009), directed by Lu Chuan, deals with the Nanjing Massacre. Through this unrelenting, graphic portrayal of violence during the Sino-Japanese War, we can understand how China had tried to process war, trauma, memory, identity, and nationalism.

Ticket required.

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Rotavirus diarrhoea kills almost half a million infants and young children each year. Rotavirus vaccines are being introduced into childhood immunisation programmes to reduce this unacceptable burden of disease. While evidence of their early impact in the Americas and Europe is striking, their greatest value in reducing childhood deaths in Africa and Asia is yet to be fully realised. This lecture will review major achievements in the global battle against rotavirus and explore remaining challenges to successful disease control.

Professor Cunliffe is Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Liverpool and Honorary Consultant Microbiologist, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.
He trained as a clinical microbiologist in Edinburgh and Liverpool and obtained a PhD from the University of Liverpool in 2001. His research interest is the epidemiology and prevention of diarrhoeal disease in children. Since the award in 1996 of a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in Clinical Tropical Medicine, Professor Cunliffe has led a long-term programme of rotavirus research in children in Malawi. This included a pivotal, Phase III clinical trial of human rotavirus vaccine which resulted in a global rotavirus vaccine recommendation by WHO.

Professor Cunliffe's work has been published in leading medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet and Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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This seminar will examine the socially constitutive force of historical racial violence, including dimensions and mechanisms of its lasting impact, remaining theoretical and empirical questions, and remedial implications. A growing body of work finds that areas of the United States marked by more pronounced histories of racial violence remain distinguished by elevated black victim homicide rates, white supremacist mobilization, support for punitive crime policy, school corporal punishment, and other violence and conflict today. These ‘haunting legacies’ are attributed to lingering traces in the psyches, identities, attitudes, behaviours, and structural relations of successive generations, yet underlying mechanisms are not well understood, and there remains a need for more direct and comparative analysis of these dynamics to inform remedial effort. To that end, I conclude with discussion of my comparative interests in the U.K. – including efforts to regulate racial abuse, and lasting impacts of these events – as elements of my engaged research on legacies of racial violence.
Registration required.

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The North West British Society of Criminology Seminar Series 2016-17, in conjunction with University of Liverpool’s International Criminological Research Unit (ICRU) and the BSC National Victims Network, present a Day Symposium on: Violence, Culture and Victimhood

Registration required.

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The purpose in this talk will be to look backwards, over 28 years of case law and legislative reform since the judiciary first derived a ‘best interests’ test for the medical treatment of adults who lack capacity from the doctrine of necessity, and forwards, in order to advocate an even more participative model of decision-making than that which has already been developed in the Court of Protection. In particular, the speaker will consider whether it might be possible for the law’s binary threshold concept of capacity to be applied in practice so that it better reflects the reality that people exist on a spectrum of decision-making ability, or more precisely, on a spectrum as to how much support they need in order to make decisions.
Registration required.

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In the XXI century, microelectronics is pursuing the new More-Than-Moore strategy, where the number of different functionalities integrated in a chip is the added value, rather than the number of integrated bits. Zero-power, intelligent, autonomous systems featuring energy efficient sensing, computation and communication are fundamentals in the Internet-of-Things and Trillion-of-Sensors planets.
Come and learn about the evolution and revolution of energy efficient wearables that exploit autonomous systems with embedded wireless low power bio- and environmental- sensors for preventive life-style and healthcare.
Fernanda Irrera, Professor at the Electronics Department of the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, will talk about a smart wearable sensing system for the detection of motion symptoms of the Parkinson’s disease.
So, hear about wearable sensing system in action and then decide for yourself whether it is the transformative technology promised.

Talk abstract:
The utility of wearable sensors in the patient care, assistance and rehabilitation consists in new and still not fully explored opportunity offered by the generation of big amount of data which can be shared on Internet. Sensors can help monitor and mitigate the effects of disorders, customize the therapy and eventually activate feedback to patients and care-givers.
The health cost is dramatically increasing and remote home care emerges as a tornado in making to reduce health care cost. In the US, health cost reached $2.5 trillion in 2009, representing 18% of the GDP (EE Times 12/9/09). The market of wearable systems for healthcare today is approximately $12 billion.
Professor Irrera will talk about the latest technological advancements in the field of motion sensing for treatment of neurological patients affected by the Parkinson's Disease.

Registration required.

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