Update for Monday 30th January 2017

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Drawing on the work of Deleuze and Guattari and of Foucault, Maurizio Lazzarato, a leading contemporary critical theorist, develops a dual understanding of subjection: on the one hand, he is interested in subjectivation, or the production of subjects; on the other, he is drawn to the way in which, through machinic enslavement, fragments of our bodies or our attention are put to work by larger machineries, the latter not simply being technical machines, but also potentially involving them.
While the former mode of subjection typically involves language (named roles, rewards and so on), the latter relies on what, drawing on Guattari, Lazzarato calls asignifying semiotics (charts, algorithms, diagrams, data, graphs etc.). Critical theory, Lazzarato notes, has endlessly discussed subjectivation and language but has almost entirely ignored machinic enslavement and asignifying semiotics despite their crucial role in contemporary subjection. He also notes that, with its attention to the visual and the material, cinema is particularly suited for engaging with the non-linguistic and the interface between the human body and different socio-economic machines. It could be argued, however, in a way that may seem deeply paradoxical, that the machinery of cinema, its focus on individual subjects and their stories and words, endlessly works to block this potential. Picking up this latter point, this paper will scrutinize some films that engage, or fail to engage, with the machinic and asks what we can learn from them.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Led by Dr Paul Jones, Bluecoat's Sociologist-in-Residence for 2017, this introduction to theories and themes of urban social life looks at how cities develop and shape the lives of their inhabitants. The most acute challenges of our age centre on cities, which have always been sites where power is concentrated, and starkly unequal access to resources are manifest. It was against this backdrop that early sociologists were fascinated by the intensified and immersive social life of major nineteenth and early-twentieth century cities such as Berlin, Chicago, London, and Paris. This course traces into the contemporary context the intellectual influence of a group of early thinkers who between them laid important foundations for what has come to be known as urban sociology.

The course addresses three key themes: theories of the urban, which seek to understand the distinctive social life of cities; social divisions and how they play out in particular cities globally; political interventions that have sought to redress social problems in cities.

In general terms, the lecture course will respond to key questions such as:

How do cities develop?
How does the city shape the realities of people who use its spaces?
What are the implications of approaching the city from a sociological perspective?

Course will go every Tuesdays from 31 Jan 2017 through 30 May 2017.

Registration required.

View on thebluecoat.org.uk

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Stereotactic radiotherapy is used for the treatment of small tumours within the body utilising high doses at each treatment session and a small number of sessions. This lecture will address both the rational for
stereotactic radiotherapy and the platforms used to deliver it.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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This seminar features three papers from the ‘Antislavery Usable Past’ project’:
Mary Wills (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation (WISE), University of Hull)
Rebecca Nelson (PhD candidate, Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation (WISE), University of Hull)
Katie Donington (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Research in Race and Rights, University of Nottingham)

These papers draw on new research undertaken as part of the AHRC-funded Antislavery Usable Past project. The project is researching the successes and failures of past antislavery movements in order to create a usable past that will inform and challenge current campaigning on unfree labour. More broadly we have been engaged in critical discussions about the relationship between past and present, and scholarship and activism.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Rheology is the science of complex liquids. Some researchers study the science using complex mathematics, whilst others use it to study everyday situations. In this presentation, the important principles of rheology will be revealed through a typical day in our lives.

Professor Howard Barnes, now an honorary professor at Chester University, spent 33 years at Unilever Research in Port Sunlight studying the flow properties of products such as Comfort, Cif, and Dove. He ended his working life as a research professor at Aberystwyth University. His passion is explaining complex ideas simply.

Registration required.

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Ignite showcases Liverpool's movers and shakers, creators, thinkers, tinkers, innovators and doers, makers and dreamers in a fast paced format designed to inspire.

Registration required.

View on igniteliverpool.com

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“I wanted to tell this story as a poem”

A daring proclamation for any filmmaker but the poetic nature of Margot Benacerraf’s film is undeniable. Using stunning imagery and clever camerawork Benacerraf conveys the hardship of life in the Venezuelan salt mines of Araya. This unconventional documentary shows a way of life, shaped by history and geography, under threat from an encroaching industrial future.

Don’t miss a chance to see this newly restored classic piece of Latin American cinema.

The film will have a short introduction from a University of Liverpool PhD student, explaining the significance of the date of the screening, 12th February, in Venezuela and the subsequent political crisis.

Ticket required.

View on liverpoolsmallcinema.org.uk