Update for Monday 5th December 2016

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Mark Carney, The Governor of the Bank of England will deliver the last Roscoe Lecture of 2016 at the BT Convention Centre on Monday 5 December.

For 20 years, LJMU has invited some of the country’s leading commentators to join staff, students and the people of Liverpool in discussing issues that matter to them.

The Roscoe Lectures use research, humour and political insight to explore current, engaging topics.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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This talk connects work on media paratexts to studies that consider how promotional and advertising materials contribute to the social construction of new media technology and consumption practice. Jonathan Gray suggests that paratexts such as trailers, intros, promos, and bonus materials help audiences to anticipate, interpret and engage with movies and television shows. However, media paratexts also help frame the meaning of the platforms that distribute, aggregate and curate film and TV content.

Using the case of on-demand television, this talk considers the promotional imagination of BBC iPlayer in a period when the Corporation was striving to communicate its digital identity and broaden iPlayer within mainstream use. Drawing on interviews with industry practitioners, and examples of key short-form promos, the talk analyses transitions in the BBC’s representation of iPlayer in the 2010s, captured in the move from 'pink portals' to 'mainstream Mums'. If, as Gray suggests, paratexts 'attempt to create interpretive communities and hermeneutic recipes for daily living in a media-saturated world', I consider how promos for iPlayer have established themselves as a means of creating 'hermeneutic recipes' for living with the new experiences of film and television in the digital era, specifically as delivered by the BBC.

Registration required.

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The Coming War On China is John Pilger's 60th documentary film. Pilger reveals what the news doesn't: that the world's greatest military power, the United States, and the world's second economic power, China, both nuclear-armed, may well be on the road to war. Pilger's film is both a warning and an inspiring story of resistance.

Ticket required.

View on fact.co.uk

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21st Century Computed Tomography images bear some interesting comparisons with photographic film X-ray images taken by the late Professor R. G. Harrison (Dept. of Anatomy, University of Liverpool) in 1968.
Liverpool University's Dr. Glenn Godenho will discuss how these X-ray images are coming back to the fore, and demonstrate their value, alongside the CT images, for understanding Tutankhamun's death and embalming.
This SciBar event is organised in collaboration with FACT and runs in conjunction with the exhibition, 'No Such Thing as Gravity'.
Registration required.

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Organised by LJMU, this public event invites you to come along and enjoy a hot drink and pastries while sharing in talks from a fascinating selection of speakers from LJMU.

Presentations will last about 20 minutes each and there will be time set aside for questions and discussion with the audience.

Registration required.

View on ljmu.ac.uk

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Science has introduced revolutionary changes in understanding ourselves and the natural world, which have acted as major drivers towards culture and civilisation. This knowledge has changed our way of living and the technologies that support society.
Paul Nurse will outline how science could be perceived as the most revolutionary activity of human-kind.

Biography:
Paul Nurse is a geneticist and cell biologist who has worked on how the eukaryotic cell cycle is controlled and how cell shape and cell dimensions are determined. His major work has been on the cyclin dependent protein kinases and how they regulate cell reproduction. He is Director of the Francis Crick Institute in London, and has served as President of the Royal Society, Chief Executive of Cancer Research UK and President of Rockefeller University. He shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine and has received the Albert Lasker Award and the Royal Society's Royal and Copley Medals. He was knighted in 1999 and received the Legion d'honneur in 2003.

Registration required.

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A regular on the UK comedy circuit, Sam will be compering an evening of entertaining ecology, at Liverpool Central Comedy club on the 12th December, 8 till late.

Sam will be poking fun at the funny side of science as BES scientists talk about all things ecological. Throughout the evening scientists will take to the stage for the British Ecological Society Science Slam to demystifying their science and explain their work in a funny and informal way.

This will be a hilarious evening of comedy and ecology and an evening not to miss!

Tickets required - all tickets include a free drink on entry!

View on eventbrite.co.uk

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At one point or another, the Nobel Laureates Thomas Mann, Jean Paul Sartre, and T.S. Eliot could each have reasonably claimed to be the most celebrated living writer in their respective national fields. But they have something in common beyond that distinction. In successive decades in the first half of the twentieth century, each founded and edited a literary-intellectual magazine: Eliot’s Criterion in London in 1922, Mann’s Mass und Wert in Zurich in 1937, and Sartre’s Les temps modernes in Paris in 1945.

In this lecture Professor Matthew Philpotts explores their contrasting realisations of the editorial role from an explicitly comparative perspective, focusing above all on the factors underlying the success, or otherwise, of these periodical publications at their decisive founding moments. Each of these authors occupied the editorial role at a different stage in their career, each brought different dispositions to the role, and each undertook a different mode of editorship. Yet their programmes for a ‘synthetic’ periodical as an antidote to the crisis of the mid-twentieth century demonstrate a surprising degree of similarity. And beyond that, their varying degrees of success as editors reveal remarkably similar underlying explanations that have little to do with their individual authorial talents or reputations.

In each case, success was dependent on the social conditions in which they founded and edited their journal and, above all, on the patterns of intellectual sociability present both in the wider ‘redaction’ of their publications and in the ‘network hubs’ of their publishing houses. As such, success as an editor reveals itself to be more the product of multiple social interactions than the result of any individual charismatic genius.

Registration required.

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Salmonella is not just a bug that causes a "touch of food poisoning" in developed countries, it can also kill. A new type of Salmonella is responsible for 400,000 deaths a year in Africa - this epidemic urgently needs to be understood, and prompted Professor Hinton to move his lab to Liverpool in 2012.

Since first getting his hands on a bacterial pathogen 25 years ago, Professor Hinton's postdoctoral career began in Oxford where he focused on individual bacterial genes. Now he is studying thousands of Salmonella genes at once in his lab in the Institute of Integrative Biology.

Professor Hinton will outline the genomics revolution that is transforming what we know about bacterial disease, and allows us to identify exactly which pathogen is infecting which person in almost real time.

Professor Hinton recently won a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator award of £1.65M to further this vital work, and will be launching the "10,000 Salmonella genomes project" in 2017. Liverpool is a crucial research hub in the battle against this dangerous pathogen.

Registration required.

View on liverpool.ac.uk

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Viz’s Barney Farmer and his comic creation Male Online for a look back at 2016 with a brand new film and Q&A.

Celebrate the wonderful 12 months we have just endured in the company of a man with his fingers on the pulsating heart of Daily Mail Britain. Not suitable for Remoaniacs or Gary Lineker.

Ticket required.

View on liverpoolsmallcinema.org.uk